EcoBlog

The latest thinking on ecological landscapes. Useful tips to improve our environment

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Kim Eierman

Kim Eierman

Founder of EcoBeneficial!

Available for virtual and in-person landscape consulting, talks and classes.

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Humming Bird and Trumpet Creeper (Campsis radicans)

Great Native Plants for Hummingbirds: What Are You Growing?

Want hummingbirds?  Skip the feeder (or add to it) and grow some of the native plants that hummingbirds favor.  Hummers particularly love red tubular flowers, so make sure to include some. Here are some hummer favorites:

Native Perennials and more for Hummingbirds
Agastache foeniculum (Anise Hyssop)
Aquilegia canadensis (Canada Columbine)
Asclepias species (Milkweed)
Chelone glabra (White Turtlehead)
Chelone lyonii (Pink Turtlehead)
Hibiscus moschueutos (Swamp Mallow)
Impatiens capensis (Spotted Jewelweed)  annual
Iris versicolor (Blueflag)
Iris virginica (Virginia Iris)
Liatris scariosa (Eastern Blazing Star)
Liatris spicata (Marsh Blazing Star)
Lilium canadense (Canada Lily)
Lilium superbum (Turk’s cap Lily)
Lobelia cardinalis (Cardinal Flower)
Lobelia siphilitica (Great Blue Lobelia)
Mertensia virginica (Virginia Bluebells) spring ephemeral
Monarda didyma (Scarlet Bee Balm)
Monarda fistulosa (Wild Bergamot)
Monarda punctata (Spotted Bee Balm)
Penstemon digitalis (Foxglove Beardtongue)
Penstemon hirsutus (Hairy Beardtongue)
Physostegia virginiana (Obedient Plant)
Phlox divaricata (Woodland Phlox)
Phlox paniculata (Tall Garden Phlox)
Ruellia humilis (Wild Petunia)
Salvia coccinea (Scarlet Sage)
Silene regia (Royal Catchfly)
Silene virginica (Fire Pink)
Spigelia marilandica (Indian Pink)

Native Vines for Hummingbirds
Bignonia capreolata (Crossvine)
Campsis radicans (Trumpet Creeper)
Lonicera sempervirens (Coral Honeysuckle)

Native Trees and Shrubs for Hummingbirds
Aesculus pavia (Red Buckeye)
Aesculus parviflora (Bottlebrush Buckeye)
Ceanothus americanus (New Jersey Tea)
Liriodendron tulipifera (Tulip Tree)
Rhododendron atlanicum (Coast Azalea)
Rhododendron arborescens (Sweet Azalea)
Rhododendron catawbiense (Catawba Rhododendron)
Rhododendron periclymenoides (Pinxterbloom)
Rhododendrom viscosum (Swamp Azalea)

Happy Nectaring from Kim Eierman EcoBeneficial!

Photo: Hummingbird and Trumpet Creeper (Campsis radicans)
Photo credit: Flickr/gerrybuckel

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