EcoBlog

The latest thinking on ecological landscapes. Useful tips to improve our environment

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Kim Eierman

Kim Eierman

Founder of EcoBeneficial!

Available for virtual and in-person landscape consulting, talks and classes.

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Multiple Duty Native Plants: The EcoBeneficial Gardener’s Secret Weapon

It’s that time of year when we start to think about spring planting. How do you choose the best plants to improve the ecosystem in your own yard? Choosing native plants which are “environmental workhorses” will not only help improve your ecosystem, but will also reward you with more birds, butterflies, beneficial insects and other critters in your yard. When considering plants, first ask:

  • Is the plant native to my region, supporting the natural ecosystem?
  • Is this the right plant for the site I am considering (sun level, moisture conditions, soil type, hardiness, etc.)

Then, see if this plant is an environmental workhorse:

Does the plant offer nectar and pollen for bees, beneficial insects, hummingbirds, etc?

  • Does the plant produce nuts, seeds, fruit, berries, etc., providing a food source for   wildlife?
  • Does the plant offer a nesting site or cover for birds, or other wildlife?
  • Will the plant help with erosion control and storm water runoff?

If a plant provides several of these functions, it’s a great candidate for an EcoBeneficial Garden.

Happy Planting from Kim Eierman at EcoBeneficial!

Photo: Honeybee on Common Buttonbush

Photo credit: wolfpix/Flickr

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