EcoBlog

The latest thinking on ecological landscapes. Useful tips to improve our environment

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Kim Eierman

Kim Eierman

Founder of EcoBeneficial!

Available for virtual and in-person landscape consulting, talks and classes.

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Wikipedia_Cutleaf Coneflower

Your Favorite Native Plants: Cutleaf Coneflower

Autumn Thomas had the final winning entry to the EcoBeneficial t-shirt contest:

“I’m going to go with Cutleaf Coneflower (Rudbeckia laciniata) even though it’s a tad aggressive, I see hundreds of bees, beetles and lepidoptera (butterflies, skippers and moths) on it every year. Then, after it goes to seed flocks of goldfinches arrive!”

Wondering if Cutleaf Coneflower would be a good fit in your landscape? Take a look:

Zones: 3 to 9
Native range: Quebec to Montana, south to Florida and Arizona
Member of the Aster family (Asteraceae).
Prefers moist, slightly acidic, fertile soil in full sun to part sun (needs moister soil in full sun).

Mature plant size: 3 to 6 feet high x 3 to 4 feet wide.
Spreads by underground stems, and can be “frisky” in the garden – give it space!
It’s a great native alternative to the exotic invasive Yellow Flag Iris (Iris Pseudacorus).

Flower heads are 2 ½” to 3” across and attract many pollinating insects including: long-tongued and short-tongued bees ( including honey bees), predatory wasps, butterflies, skippers, moths, some beetles and flies.

Cutleaf Coneflower is a host plant for caterpillars of the Silvery Checkerspot butterfly and several moths.

Leave the stems and dried flower heads standing through winter to provide seeds for Goldfinches and overwintering sites for insect egg cases (Praying Mantids included!).

Plant Native! from Kim Eierman at EcoBeneficial!

Photo: Rudbeckia lacianata (Cutleaf Coneflower)
Photo credit: Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Oohangousou.JPG

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