EcoBlog

The latest thinking on ecological landscapes. Useful tips to improve our environment

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Kim Eierman

Kim Eierman

Founder of EcoBeneficial!

Available for virtual and in-person landscape consulting, talks and classes.

Buy a copy of
The Pollinator Victory Garden!

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Hummingbird in flower

Top 10 New Year’s Resolutions for the EcoBeneficial Gardener

1. Reduce or eliminate your lawn – it’s an ecological desert.

2. Focus on increasing the health of your soil – it’s filled with life!  Compost is king for most soils, not fertilizer.

3. Eliminate synthetic pesticides, herbicides + fungicides.  Use organic counterparts sparingly, if at all.

4. Support beneficial insects with appropriate native plantings.  They are nature’s pest control.

5. Plant for a succession of bloom throughout the growing season to support native bees and honey bees.  Bees are critical, keystone species.

6. Emulate nature in your garden – use local wild areas as your reference.

7. Plant the right plant in the right place.  Don’t put sun-loving plants in the shade, moisture-loving plants in dry soil…

8. Remove invasive plants and replace them thickly and quickly with regional native plants.

9. Tolerate some messiness in your landscape to support wildlife.  Check out all the critters living under a dead log!

10. Boost the ecosystem in your landscape by planting a diversity of regional native plants.

Best wishes for a happy and ecologically healthy 2014!
From Kim Eierman at EcoBeneficial!

Photo: Ruby-throated hummingbird nectaring on Campsis radicans (Trumpet Creeper)
Photo credit: Flickr_Kelly Colgan Azar

6 Comments

  1. Helga Smith on January 3, 2014 at 5:21 pm

    Hello Kim –
    Thank you for your continued helpful advise – I love everyone of your postings.
    Happy and healthy 2014 and success with all your plantings.
    Cheers –
    Helga



  2. Phyllis Stiles, Bee City USA on January 3, 2014 at 10:26 pm

    This is a great list! Happy New Year, Kim.



  3. Kim Eierman on January 4, 2014 at 10:53 am

    Thanks Phyllis! Hope you will share the list with Bee City USA followers. What is good for bees is good for the environment!



  4. Kim Eierman on January 4, 2014 at 11:00 am

    Thanks for your support Helga! Best wishes to you for a happy and “green” new year!



  5. Susanne Servin on January 4, 2014 at 4:29 pm

    Best wishes for the New Year from neighboring Tuckahoe – unfortunately i cannot keep bees- against village regulations……
    I love your 10 New Years resolutions and while I already do some (lawn!!_ i shall try to do all of them in 2014.



  6. Kim Eierman on January 4, 2014 at 8:44 pm

    Thanks Susanne! Good to hear that you will be adopting even more “green” resolutions. Every bit helps. Even if you can’t keep bees, you help tremendously by planting for honey bees and native bees. Happy New Year!



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