Going Pesticide-Free for Pollinators at The Farm Between

This past August, I took a road trip to one of my favorite states, Vermont, where lots of good things are happening with organic and pesticide-free landscapes and nursery production.  One of my stops was “The Farm Between” in pastoral Jeffersonville, Vermont.  This is one of the oldest farms in the area, dating back to the early 1800s;  it used…

Read More

20 Resolutions for the EcoBeneficial Landscape

It’s that time of year to make your resolutions for 2015.  Don’t forget to include your landscape!  Here are 20 resolutions to get you started toward a healthier ecosystem: 1) Reduce or eliminate the “Green Desert” (turf/lawn). Exotic turf grass is an ecological wasteland.  When replacing lawn, don’t replace one monoculture with another.  Plant diversely using regionally appropriate native plants.…

Read More

Pollinators of Native Plants With Heather Holm

EcoBeneficial! is delighted to be back online after a medical emergency and a long recovery period.   I return with an interview with Heather Holm, author of Pollinators of Native Plants: Attract, Observe and Identify Pollinators and Beneficial Insects With Native Plants. Click to watch the slideshow Click to listen to the podcast Holm is a landscape designer and consultant specializing…

Read More

Fall Checklist for the EcoBeneficial Landscape

Now that fall is here, is your landscape in good order?  Following some simple steps can prevent or lessen the impacts of a harsh winter, and lay the groundwork for best results in the spring. Fall Checklist – 15 Steps to Ecological Health 1) If you have plants to be planted, it may be too late.  Newly-planted plants should be…

Read More

Eco-Lessons from the Farm: GMO Corn & Pollinators

EcoBeneficial! went on a working vacation to Vermont this summer and visited some organic farms, including River Berry Farm in Fairfax, Vermont.  After you finish this post watch my short video interview with organic farmer and pollinator advocate, Jane Sorensen, co-owner of River Berry Farm, to pick up some tips. My encounters with forward thinking organic farmers who embrace nature…

Read More

The Value of Signs in an Ecological Landscape

How do you communicate to your neighbors why you have little or no lawn, why you have a diversity of native plants, why your trees are not topped, why your shrubs are not pruned into meatballs, why you leave your perennials and grasses standing through winter? Many of our neighbors are baffled by our ecological landscapes – filled with diverse…

Read More

A Closer Look at Monarchs & Milkweeds: Latest Information from Xerces

Milkweeds (Asclepias species) are getting a lot of attention these days since they are the only larval host plants for the threatened Monarch Butterfly.   As you may know, butterfly caterpillars have a different diet than their adult counterparts.   Most caterpillars eat plant parts, usually leaves.  Monarch caterpillars only eat the leaves of milkweeds. The Xerces Society, a non-profit leader in…

Read More

Extending the Garden With Great Native Plants in Pots

If you are like many gardeners, you are scouring your landscape to figure out where else you can squeeze in another plant.  No empty spots in your garden?  No problem.  Containers are the answer!  While many gardeners plant in pots, few realize that there are many native plants which will do very well in containers.  Not only are native perennials…

Read More

Spring Wildflowers With Carol Gracie part 1

After a long, cold, seemingly never-ending winter, what a treat it was to go on a spring wildflower hike with author, photographer and naturalist Carol Gracie.  Gracie is the author of two excellent books on wildflowers.  Her first book, Wildflowers in the Field and Forest: A Field Guide to the Northeastern United States, was co-authored with Steven Clemants and published…

Read More