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Kim Eierman

Kim Eierman

Founder of EcoBeneficial!

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Iris Versicolor

What Are Some Deer-Resistant Flowering Native Perennials for a Wet Meadow?

Question:

What are some native, deer-resistant flowering perennials for wet meadows in the Northeast?

Answer:

As you likely know, no plant is deer bomb-proof.  In the absence of adequate forage, deer will browse just about anything. Young fawns may nibble on plants that make them sick, as they have not yet figured out the menu.

Here are some typically deer-resistant, native flowering perennials suitable for wet meadows or landscapes with moist to wet soils. Make sure that your deer get this list!

Asclepias incarnata (Swamp milkweed)
Caltha palustris (Marsh marigold)
Chelone glabra (White turtlehead)
Conoclinium coelestinum (Blue mistflower)
Eutrochium dubium (Coastal Joe-Pye weed)
Eutrochium fistulosum (Hollow Joe-Pye weed)
Eutrochium maculatum (Joe-Pye weed)
Eutrochium purpureum (Purple Joe-Pye weed)
Eupatorium perfoliatum (Boneset)
Euthamia graminifolia (Grass-leaved goldenrod)
Iris versicolor (Blue flag iris)
Lobelia siphilitica (Great blue lobelia)
Monarda didyma (Scarlet beebalm)
Physostegia virginiana (Obedient plant)
Sisyrinchium angustifolium (Blue-eyed grass)
Solidago rugosa (Wrinkled leaf goldenrod)
Verbena hastata (Blue vervain)
Vernonia noveboracencis (New York ironweed)

Before you plant, check to see which of these plants are appropriate for your ecoregion and suitable for your site conditions. Some of these plants will do well in moist or wet, saturated soils, while others prefer moist, well draining soils. Some prefer sun, while others tolerate part shade. The old adage “plant the right plant in the right place” is your key to success.

Young plants and plants emerging in the early spring are particularly appealing to deer. If your deer browse is really bad, you may want to protect even deer-resistant plants early in the season, until they become less palatable.

Good luck and happy planting!

From Kim Eierman at EcoBeneficial!

 

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